Middle East Regional Instability From WMDs To Border Disputes

A couple of interesting articles from Oilprice.com that cover recent calls for the unification of defense forces of the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, Oman, Qatar and Kuwait.  Along with the acquisition of nuclear weapons for the above mentioned unified defense force.  Followed by an article on border disputes over oil fields between Iraq and its neighbors.

Basically the Sauds want a NATO style combined arms force with nuclear capabilities.  It’s worth noting that Osama Bin Laden and the 9/11 high-jackers were Saudi.  The real threat of nuclear terrorism doesn’t reside with Iran, it stems from Saudi Arabia with its CIA controlled puppet government.

 

http://oilprice.com/Geo-Politics/Middle-East/Saudi-Prince-Calls-for-Kingdom-to-Acquire-WMDs.html

So much for peace in the Middle East.

On 5 December Prince bin Turki al Faisal, speaking at the “The Gulf and the Globe” conference in the Saudi capital Riyadh  urged the six-nation Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) to become a powerful regional bloc by establishing a unified armed force and defense structure.

While bin Turki’s call for the GCC to pool its military resources is nothing new, his idea of supporting Gulf countries acquiring weapons of mass destruction (WMDs) if Israel and Iran do not constrain their nuclear programs represents the edge of a precipitously slippery slope.

Bin Turki told his audience, “Why shouldn’t we commence the building of a unified military force, with a clear chain of command. But, if our efforts and the efforts of the world community fail to bring about the dismantling of the Israeli arsenal of nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons and preventing Iran from acquiring the same, then why shouldn’t we at least study seriously all available options, including acquiring WMDs, so that our future generations will not blame us for neglecting any courses of action that will keep looming dangers away from us.”

 

http://oilprice.com/Geo-Politics/Middle-East/Could-War-Flare-Again-Between-Iraq-and-Kuwait.html

While Iraq and Kuwait are now at peace, many of the border issues that led to conflict two decades ago remain, which no amount of diplomatic bonhomie can completely paper over.

In 1993 the United Nations Security Council Resolution 833 precisely delineated the previous borders between Iraq and Kuwait following Saddam Hussein’s invasion of his neighbor in August 1990. Iraqi forces were summarily expelled by a 34-nation coalition led by the United States during Operation Desert Storm, which began in February 1991. That conflict left Iraq with a $22 billion reparations bill to Kuwait that it is still struggling to pay off, tithing 5 percent of its oil revenue to its tiny plutocratic southern neighbor.